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  • Writer's pictureSubhan Tariq, Esq

The Impact of Collections on your credit score






When you fall behind on paying a bill or a loan, the creditor may send your account to a collection agency. This can have a significant impact on your credit score and make it difficult to get approved for credit in the future. In this blog post, we'll explore what collections are, how they affect your credit score, and what steps you can take to minimize their impact.



What is a Collection?

When you miss a payment on a debt, the creditor may eventually send your account to a collection agency. The collection agency will then attempt to collect the debt on behalf of the creditor. This can include phone calls, letters, and other methods of communication.

If you continue to ignore the debt, the collection agency may take legal action against you. This can result in a judgment against you, which can make it easier for the collection agency to collect the debt, including garnishing your wages or seizing your bank account.



How Do Collections Affect Your Credit Score?

Collections can have a significant negative impact on your credit score. According to FICO, a single collection account can reduce your credit score by as much as 100 points. The impact of a collection account can last for up to seven years.


The reason for this significant impact on your credit score is that collections are a clear indication that you have failed to pay a debt as agreed. This raises a red flag for lenders, who may see you as a risky borrower who is unlikely to pay back future debts. This can make it harder for you to get approved for credit in the future and may result in higher interest rates and less favorable terms.


What Steps Can You Take to Minimize the Impact of Collections on Your Credit Score?

If you have a collection account on your credit report, there are steps you can take to minimize its impact on your credit score.



First, you should contact the collection agency and try to negotiate a payment plan or settlement. Even if you can't afford to pay off the entire debt, you may be able to work out a plan to pay it off in installments or settle the debt for a lower amount.


Second, you should check your credit report to ensure that the collection account is being reported accurately. Sometimes collection accounts can be reported in error or can be duplicated on your credit report, which can further damage your credit score.


Third, you should work to rebuild your credit after a collection account. This may include paying all of your bills on time, reducing your debt, and applying for new credit accounts in a responsible manner.




Finally, you should seek the guidance of a credit counseling agency or financial advisor to develop a plan for managing your finances and rebuilding your credit. These professionals can provide you with valuable guidance and support as you navigate the challenges of a collection account.


In conclusion, collections can have a significant impact on your credit score. The impact will depend on a variety of factors, including the amount of debt, the length of time that has passed since the account was sent to collections, and the accuracy of the information being reported on your credit report. If you have a collection account on your credit report, it's important to contact the collection agency and try to negotiate a payment plan or settlement, check your credit report for accuracy, work to rebuild you




r credit, and seek the guidance of a credit counseling agency or financial advisor. With the right strategies and support, you can minimize the impact of a collection account on your credit score and move forward with confidence.


Please reach out to us at info@tariqlaw.com if you have any questions, or submit a case review request on our website.


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