• Subhan Tariq, Esq

Should You Pay Time-Barred Debts?



Collectors are allowed to contact you about time-barred debts. They might tell you that the debt is time-barred and that they can't sue you if you don't pay.

If a collector doesn't tell you that a particular debt is time-barred — but you think that it might be — ask the collector if the debt is beyond the statute of limitations. If the collector answers your question, the law requires that his answer be truthful. Some collectors may decline to answer, however. Another question to ask a collector if you think that a debt might be time-barred is what their records show as the date of your last payment. This is important because it helps determine when the statute of limitations clock starts ticking. If a collector doesn't give you this information, send him a letter within 30 days of receiving a written notice of the debt. Explain that you are 'disputing' the debt and that you want to 'verify' it. The more information you give the collector about why you are disputing the debt, the better. Collectors must stop trying to collect until they give you verification. Keep a copy of your letter and the verification you receive.

The decision to pay a time-barred debt is up to you. You have options, but each one has consequences. Consider talking to a lawyer before you choose an option.



  • Pay nothing on the debt. Although the collector may not sue you to collect the debt, you still owe it. The collector can continue to contact you to try to collect, unless you send a letter to the collector demanding that communication stop. Not paying a debt may make it harder, or more expensive, to get credit, insurance, or other services because not paying may lower your credit rating.

  • Make a partial payment on the debt. In some states, if you pay any amount on a time-barred debt or even promise to pay, the debt is 'revived.' This means the clock resets and a new statute of limitations period begins. It also often means the collector can sue you to collect the full amount of the debt, which may include additional interest and fees.

  • Pay off the debt. Even though the collector may not be able to sue you, you may decide to pay off the debt. Some collectors may be willing to accept less than the amount you owe to settle the debt, either in one large payment or a series of small ones. Make sure you get a signed form or letter from the collector before you make any payment. This document should state that the entire debt is being settled and that the amount to be paid will release you from any further obligation. Without this document, the amount paid may be treated as a partial payment on the debt, instead of a complete payment. Keep a record of the payments you make to pay off the debt.

It's against the law for a collector to sue you or threaten to sue you on a time-barred debt. If you think a collector has broken the law, consider talking to an attorney about bringing your own private action against the collector for violating the FDCPA.

Call 718-674-1245 or message here.


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The Law Offices of Subhan Tariq, Esq., PLLC. has offices in Jamaica Estates, New York. Attorney Tariq represents clients throughout the New York Metro area including throughout Nassau, Queens, Ridgewood, Astoria, Forest Hills, Great Neck, Jamaica, Flushing, Bayside, Woodside, Sunnyside, Rego Park, Briarwood, Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, Kew Gardens, Fresh Meadows, Ridgewood, Middle Village, Ozone Park, Little Neck, Roslyn, Floral Park, East Hills, Westbury, Plainview, Syosset and Manhasset and throughout Brooklyn, Queens County, Nassau County and New York County.

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