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  • Writer's pictureSubhan Tariq, Esq

How Bankruptcy Impacts Your Credit Score





Bankruptcy is a legal process that allows individuals or businesses to declare themselves unable to repay their debts. While bankruptcy can provide relief from overwhelming debt, it can also have a significant impact on your credit score. In this blog, we'll discuss how bankruptcy impacts your credit score.


What is a Credit Score?

First, let's define what a credit score is. A credit score is a three-digit number that reflects your creditworthiness. It's calculated based on several factors, including your payment history, outstanding debt, length of credit history, types of credit, and new credit.

Credit scores range from 300 to 850, with higher scores indicating a better credit history. Lenders and creditors use credit scores to determine the likelihood that you'll repay a loan or credit card debt.


How Does Bankruptcy Impact Your Credit Score?

When you file for bankruptcy, it will have a significant impact on your credit score. The exact impact depends on several factors, including the type of bankruptcy you file, the amount of debt you have, and your credit history before filing.


Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

Chapter 7 bankruptcy is also known as liquidation bankruptcy. It's the most common type of bankruptcy for individuals. In a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, a court-appointed trustee sells your non-exempt assets to pay off your debts.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy will stay on your credit report for ten years from the date of filing. This can have a significant impact on your credit score. Filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy can reduce your credit score by 200 to 250 points or more, depending on your credit history before filing.


Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

Chapter 13 bankruptcy is also known as reorganization bankruptcy. It allows you to keep your assets and pay off your debts over a period of three to five years. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you'll make monthly payments to a court-appointed trustee who will distribute the funds to your creditors.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy will stay on your credit report for seven years from the date of filing. Filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy can reduce your credit score by 130 to 240 points, depending on your credit history before filing.


Rebuilding Your Credit After Bankruptcy

While bankruptcy can have a significant impact on your credit score, it's not the end of the road. You can rebuild your credit after bankruptcy, but it will take time and effort. Here are some tips for rebuilding your credit:


1. Make Timely Payments

The most important thing you can do to rebuild your credit after bankruptcy is to make timely payments. Pay your bills on time, every time. Late payments can have a significant impact on your credit score.


2. Get a Secured Credit Card

A secured credit card is a credit card that requires a security deposit. It's a good option for people who have a low credit score or no credit history. Use your secured credit card responsibly and make timely payments.


3. Monitor Your Credit Report

Monitor your credit report regularly to ensure that it's accurate. Dispute any errors or inaccuracies that you find.


4. Avoid High-Interest Loans and Credit Cards

Avoid high-interest loans and credit cards. These can be tempting, but they can also lead to more debt.


5. Practice Good Financial Habits

Finally, practice good financial habits. Create a budget, live within your means, and save for emergencies.


In conclusion, bankruptcy can have a significant impact on your credit score. Chapter 7 bankruptcy will stay on your credit report for ten years, while Chapter 13 bankruptcy will stay on your credit report for seven years. However, you can rebuild your credit after bankruptcy by making timely payments, getting a secured credit card, monitoring your credit report, avoiding high-interest loans and credit cards, and practicing good financial habits. For more info, reach out to us at info@tariqlaw.com, or submit a case review request.

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